Category Archives: Education

Father Forgets (by W. Livingston Larned)

This beautiful poem which has a lot to say about human relations was featured at a best-selling book entitled “How to Win Friends and Influence People” written by Dale Carnegie in 1937.

Teachers, Parents, and other people and institutions who handle youth and children ought to read this fascinating piece of literature.

Listen, son: I am saying this as you lie asleep, one little paw crumpled under your cheek and the blond curls stickily wet on your damp forehead. I have stolen into your room alone. Just a few minutes ago, as I sat reading my paper in the library, a stifling wave of remorse swept over me. Guiltily I came to your bedside.

There are the things I was thinking, son: I had been cross to you. I scolded you as you were dressing for school because you gave your face merely a dab with a towel. I took you to task for not cleaning your shoes. I called out angrily when you threw some of your things on the floor.

At breakfast I found fault, too. You spilled things. You gulped down your food. You put your elbows on the table. You spread butter too thick on your bread. And as you started off to play and I made for my train, you turned and waved a hand and called, “Goodbye, Daddy!” and I frowned, and said in reply,

“Hold your shoulders back!”

Then it began all over again in the late afternoon. As I came up the road I spied you, down on your knees, playing marbles. There were holes in your stockings. I humiliated you before your boyfriends by marching you ahead of me to the house. Stockings were expensive‐and if you had to buy them you would be more careful! Imagine that, son, from a father!

Do you remember, later, when I was reading in the library, how you came in timidly, with a sort of hurt look in your eyes? When I glanced up over my paper, impatient at the interruption, you hesitated at the door. “What is it you want?” I snapped. You said nothing, but ran across in one tempestuous plunge, and threw your arms around my neck and kissed me, and your small arms tightened with an affection that God had set blooming in your heart and which even neglect could not wither.

And then you were gone, pattering up the stairs. Well, son, it was shortly afterwards that my paper slipped from my hands and a terrible sickening fear came over me. What has habit been doing to me?

The habit of finding fault, of reprimanding‐this was my reward to you for being a boy. It was not that I did not love you; it was that I expected too much of youth. I was measuring you by the yardstick of my own years.

And there was so much that was good and fine and true in your character. The little heart of you was as big as the dawn itself over the wide hills. This was shown by your spontaneous impulse to rush in and kiss me good night. Nothing else matters tonight, son. I have come to your bedside in the darkness, and I have knelt there, ashamed!

It is feeble atonement; I know you would not understand these things if I told them to you during your waking hours. But tomorrow I will be a real daddy! I will chum with you, and suffer when you suffer, and laugh when you laugh. I will bite my tongue when impatient words come. I will keep saying as if it were a ritual: “He is nothing but a boy‐a little boy!”

I am afraid I have visualized you as a man. Yet as I see you now, son, crumpled and weary in your cot, I see that you are still a baby. Yesterday you were in your mother’s arms, your head on her shoulder. I have asked too much, too much.

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Nature of Inquiry: Handout and Take-home Activities

For my ABM Students, please follow (click) the link below which will direct you to the presentation I created. thanks.

References: Practical Research 1 by Esther L. Baraceros

NATURE OF INQUIRY

ATTENDANCE SHEET

Tablets should replace Print-textbooks in the Philippine K-12 Classroom

by HARK HERALD C. SARMIENTO

Tablets, according to its proponents, are supported by most teachers, parents, and students as they are proven to be more efficient tools in the learning process than textbooks. The media has elated the public with the fact that tablets can hold hundreds of digital textbooks while remaining much lighter and cheaper than print textbooks (“Tablets vs. Textbooks,” 2013). However, there is much more to tablets than a mere light and nifty electronic book (e-book) reader (“Better reasons,” 2011). Tablets pave the way to a wider and unlimited source of learning which improve students’ cognitive capacity and increase their interactivity and creativity. As the use of tablets has been proven effective in facilitating and improving students’ learning, schools must take advantage of this advanced learning tool. Thus, the Philippine K-12 classrooms should switch from using print textbooks to utilizing interactive, digital textbooks and other educational applications on tablets.
The most obvious benefit of using tablets in schools is that it solves the problem of backpack-related injuries. Backpacks, which are bags loaded with varied books for school use carried by a strap on the back or shoulder, has developed spine problems to school children at such a young age (“Avoid bad back,” 2012). Thus, the use of tablets in the K-12 classroom solves the dilemma, as a tablet filled with 3,500 e-books weighs only around 1-2 pounds. The same number of physical books would weigh about two tons – four thousand (4000) times heavier than the weight of a tablet. But this is only the tip of the ice berg. There is more to tablets which makes it worth procuring.
In the continuous effort of the government to address the problems the education sector faces, it is aiming to eventually use tablet-based reading materials in place of traditional textbooks (Aquino III, 2012). Apparently, the government recognizes the efficiency of tablets in making learning in the classroom more engaging. Tablets can also solve the patent lack of books and resources in the Philippine education system.
This innovation in education gained support from publishing houses, organizations, and other firms around the country. Vibal Publishing House, Inc. for example, has partnered with Microsoft Corporation to run open source applications for secure, fast and flexible delivery of digital learning tools (“Vibal Publishing chooses Microsoft”, 2013). Vibal also introduced two low-cost tablet models which will be loaded with interactive Math and Science application modules as part of the initiatives of the Department of Science and Technology (DOST) to improve public education in those areas (Villavicencio, 2012). Lifeware Technology, another digital service provider, launched an Android-powered tablet for children aged 3 – 8 called as the Enlight KiddieTAB. The KiddieTAB is preloaded with 100 educational applications like language and literacy, math, art and music, and Filipino which children can learn with fun. (Magdirila 2013; Bernabe 2013).
The effective impact of learning from interactive applications and digital textbooks loaded on tablets is discussed in an article written by Janet Maragioglio (2012) entitled “IPads Boost Math Scores, Benefit Education.” The article explains the claim of publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt that students who used iPad (one of the many tablet brands) in learning Algebra 1 scored extremely higher on all math class and standardized tests than those who used print textbooks. Thus, it is a proof that the use of tablets enhances education by engaging, motivating, and making students eager to learn.
However beneficial tablets may appear, there are others who are not convinced with its effectiveness. Pessimists claim that using tablets is more expensive than using print textbooks. Others even argue that tablets have too many distractions for classroom use. Finally, they claim that it is an additional task for the teacher to learn using these devices which is most of the times difficult for them to master (especially the old ones).
The opposition argues that “implementing tablets in K-12 schools requires purchasing hardware (the tablet) and software (the textbooks), setting up new wi-fi facility, and training teachers and administrators how to use the technology. Implementation costs for e-textbooks on iPad tablets are 552% higher than new print textbooks in an average high school (“Tablets vs. Textbooks,” 2013). This concern was raised with optimism by President Aquino (2012) when he said at the launching of K-12 educational program that the government is just waiting for the prices to go down; and as it is, they’re already close to target. It appears that tablets’ price is inversely proportional with the demand for it, thus increasing its favorability for classroom use.
The opposition argues that tablets have too many distractions for classroom use. Students may pay attention to applications (more commonly known as “apps”), e-mail, games, and websites instead of their teachers and the lessons being discussed in the class. (“Tablets vs. Textbooks,” 2013). Fortunately, in Buffalo, New York, it was found that the best solution was to implement device management software… (Sheridan 2013) By the use of software management, educators (teachers) can manage the programs that students use and access through the tablets – the educational applications installed at tablets provided by Vibal and Lifeware as it has been discussed earlier (Villavicencio 2012; Magdirila 2013; Bernabe 2013). Thus, proper management of the devices will ensure that the aim and purpose of providing them in schools will be maintained. In addition, in case errors are found in the materials, information can be easily corrected through internet servers (Aquino III, 2012).
PNoy (2012), as we call the Philippine president, is well aware of the situation teachers will face in this era we live in which we call the digital or information age. Teachers must be in possession of a wider range of knowledge to cope with the innovations the modern technology provides. As the government aims at providing today’s youth with better opportunities to acquire information and to learn, educators must be adept with these technologies and continuously update themselves with the latest trends. In response, the government will provide teachers the proper training aside from the personal studies they must undertake to fully grasp this leap on our education system. Thus, the success of the program relies on everybody’s hands and concern. Teachers must attract the interest and sustain attention of the students by carefully facilitating or utilizing interactive and engaging learning materials in the classroom – learning tools that are provided by the government and other institutions.
Looking at the current situation of education in the Philippines, one might argue that the Philippines is not yet ready for replacing textbooks with tablets due to the cost it may incur for the government. The readiness of teachers in using the innovative device is also in question. However, our stand is that it is the proper time now to start the changes in the Philippine classrooms. We have already taken the first step of changing the educational curriculum by introducing K-12. Soon, books should be provided for the students of K-12. Therefore it is the proper time to introduce the use of tablets in the classrooms which can foster and contain the new book editions for the K-12 classes which are more interactive and best facilitate learning.
The replacement of textbooks with tablets addresses not only the financial capability of the Philippines to purchase these digital devices for learning but also the readiness of the teachers in utilizing them. However, whether you’re a technologically adept teacher with all the latest devices or a stereotype who barely manages to keep up with a vintage mobile phone unit, technology has proven itself to be a force for change. Therefore teachers of this milieu must learn to adapt and be adept with the use of these innovations brought by the advanced technologies. As today’s classrooms undergo a technological makeover and computer programs become fundamental to the learning process, we foresee students of the Philippine K-12 program spend less time turning printed book pages and more time tapping tablet screens.

 

 

References:
ProCon.org. (2013, September 20). Tablets vs. Textbooks ProCon.org. Retrieved from http://tablets-textbooks.procon.org/
Aquino III, B. S. (2012, April 24). Speech of President Aquino at the launch of the K to 12 Basic Education Program (English translation).

The Official Gazette of the Republic of the Philippines. Retrieved from http://www.gov.ph/2012/04/24/speech-of-president-aquino-at-the-launch-of-the-k-to-12-basic-education-program-april-24-2012-english-translation/

Maragioglio, J. (2012, January 31) IPads Boost Math Scores, Benefit Education. Retrieved from http://www.mobiledia.com/news/126150.html

Better reasons for using tablets in Philippine schools. (2011, June 14). Once an Educator. Retrieved from http://teacherhoney.blogspot.com/2011/06/better-reasons-for-using-tablets-in.html

Avoid bad back, check backpack. (2012, May 29). The Philippine Star. Retrieved from http://www.philstar.com/health-and-family/811380/avoid-bad-back-check-backpack

Vibal Publishing chooses Microsoft’s Windows Azure for more efficient delivery of digital learning tools. (2013). Microsoft Philippines. Retrieved from http://www.microsoft.com/philippines/pressroom/Vibal-chooses-Microsofts-Windows-Azure.aspx

Villavicencio, P. (2012, May 9). Vibal outs low-cost education tablet, cloud servers for digital classrooms. InterAksyon. Retrieved from http://www.interaksyon.com/infotech/vibal-outs-low-cost-education-tablet-cloud-servers-for-digital-classrooms

Magdirila, P. (2013, August 29). KiddieTAB, the 8-inch tablet tailor-made for children’s education. TECH IN ASIA. Retrieved from http://www.techinasia.com/kiddietab-8inch-tablet-tailormade-childrens-education/

Bernabe, Kirstin. (2013, August 19). A tablet designed for kids and step-ladder learning. Philippine Daily Inquirer. Retrieved from http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/469319/a-tablet-designed-for-kids-and-step-ladder-learning
Sheridan, K. (2013, July 11). Textbooks To Tablets: The Progression Of Classroom Technology. Information Week Education. Retrieved from http://www.informationweek.com/education/mobility/textbooks-to-tablets-the-progression-of/2401579111

BOYCHOIR: Essential Questions

For: Grades 9 & 10
1. Is it possible to immortalize yourself? How? Use the film as reference to your answer.
2. Who are the static and dynamic characters in the film? Prove your answer by providing evidences from the film.
3. Explain the line “I have no hope in any other than you.” How do you relate this message in the film?

For: Grade 10 only
4. What is utilitarianism? How is it applicable/presented in the film? Cite instances in the film to support your answer.

Division Seminar Workshop, inilunsad: 200 SPA, lumahok

This straight news I wrote (output in Filipino) for the recently culminated Division Seminar Workshop for School Paper Advisers won first place.

School Paper Advisers

BALANGA CITY, Bataan – Humigit kumulang sa dalawang daang School Paper Advisers (SPA) mula sa elementarya at sekondarya ang lumahok sa inilunsad na Division Seminar-Workshop for School Paper Advisers na ginanap sa Crown Royale Hotel, Agosto 19.

Layunin ng nasabing gawain na bigyan ng karagdagang kaalaman ang mga school paper advisers tungkol sa iba’t ibang kategorya ng Campus Journalism.

Tinalakay ni G. Emmanuel Zacharias sa unang araw ng seminar-workshop ang School Paper Management. Binigyang diin naman ni G. Ben P. Medina ang News Writing at Editorial Writing. Bago matapos ang kanyang panayam, ipinakita niya ang pagkakahalintulad at pagkakaiba ng News Writing, Feature Writing, at Editorial Writing. Ipinaliwanag naman ni Bb. Annabelle Ambrocio ang wastong gamit ng mga simbolo sa Copyreading at ang mabisang paggawa ng Headline.

Sa ikalawang araw ng seminar-workshop, ipinakita ni G. Edgar Valencia ang mga dapat isaalang-alang sa pagkuha ng larawan sa Photojournalism. Ipinaliwanag din niya ang mga teknikal na aspeto ng kamera. Ipinakita naman ni Dr. Andres Matawaran ang mga salik na nakapaloob sa Feature Writing at Science Feature. Sinabi niya na “ang Science Feature ay isang Feature article na may mas maraming impormasyon.” Binigyang-pansin naman ni G. Joel Castro sa kanyang panayam ukol sa Cartooning kung paano ituro sa mga bata ang tamang pagbuo ng konsepto.

Ibinahagi ni G. Ronaldo Punla sa huling araw ang mga Sports-lingo na ginagamit sa Sports Writing. Sinabi niya na dapat ipakita ng isang Sports Writer ang mga “action” sa sports upang makuha ang interes ng mambabasa. Isa rin sa mga resource speaker si G. Mark Sherwin Balor na nagpanayam ukol sa Collaborative Writing.

Matapos ang lahat ng panayam sa ikatlong araw ay magkakaroon ng election ng Bataan Association of Elementary and Secondary School Paper Advisers (BAESSPA) Officers sa ganap na 3:30 – 5:00 ng hapon.

Ang punong-abala para sa tatlong-araw na Division Seminar-Workshop ay si Gng. Mila D. Calma, Education Program Supervisor ng Filipino.

THE PRAYING HANDS

Back in the fifteenth century, in a tiny village near Nuremberg, lived a family with eighteen children. Eighteen!

In order merely to keep food on the table for this big family, the father and head of the household, a goldsmith by profession, worked almost eighteen hours a day at his trade and any other paying chore he could find in the neighbourhood.

Despite their seemingly hopeless condition, two of Albrecht Durer the Elder’s children had a dream. They both wanted to pursue their talent for art, but they knew full well that their father would never be financially able to send either of them to Nuremberg to study at the Academy.

After many long discussions at night in their crowded bed, the two boys finally worked out a pact. They would toss a coin. The loser would go down into the nearby mines and, with his earnings, support his brother while he attended the academy. Then, when that brother who won the toss completed his studies, in four years, he would support the other brother at the academy, either with sales of his artwork or, if necessary, also by labouring in the mines.

They tossed a coin on a Sunday morning after church. Albrecht Durer won the toss and went off to Nuremberg.

Praying Hands

This is Albert Durer’s Hands painted by his brother Albrecht Durer

Albert went down into the dangerous mines and, for the next four years, financed his brother, whose work at the academy was almost an immediate sensation. Albrecht’s etchings, his woodcuts, and his oils were far better than those of most of his professors, and by the time he graduated, he was beginning to earn considerable fees for his commissioned works.

When the young artist returned to his village, the Durer family held a festive dinner on their lawn to celebrate Albrecht’s triumphant homecoming. After a long and memorable meal, punctuated with music and laughter, Albrecht rose from his honoured position at the head of the table to drink a toast to his beloved brother for the years of sacrifice that had enabled Albrecht to fulfil his ambition. His closing words were, “And now, Albert, blessed brother of mine, now it is your turn. Now you can go to Nuremberg to pursue your dream, and I will take care of you.”

All heads turned in eager expectation to the far end of the table where Albert sat, tears streaming down his pale face, shaking his lowered head from side to side while he sobbed and repeated, over and over, “No …no …no …no.”

Finally, Albert rose and wiped the tears from his cheeks. He glanced down the long table at the faces he loved, and then, holding his hands close to his right cheek, he said softly, “No, brother. I cannot go to Nuremberg. It is too late for me. Look … look what four years in the mines have done to my hands! The bones in every finger have been smashed at least once, and lately I have been suffering from arthritis so badly in my right hand that I cannot even hold a glass to return your toast, much less make delicate lines on parchment or canvas with a pen or a brush. No, brother … for me it is too late.”

More than 450 years have passed. By now, Albrecht Durer’s hundreds of masterful portraits, pen and silver point sketches, water-colours, charcoals, woodcuts, and copper engravings hang in every great museum in the world, but the odds are great that you, like most people, are familiar with only one of Albrecht Durer’s works. More than merely being familiar with it, you very well may have a reproduction hanging in your home or office.

One day, to pay homage to Albert for all that he had sacrificed, Albrecht Durer painstakingly drew his brother’s abused hands with palms together and thin fingers stretched skyward. He called his powerful drawing simply “Hands,” but the entire world almost immediately opened their hearts to his great masterpiece and renamed his tribute of love “The Praying Hands.”

The next time you see a copy of that touching creation, take a second look. Let it be your reminder, if you still need one, that no one – no one – – ever makes it alone!